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   ► KBTo/From GuidesASP ClassicTool Basics  Print This     

Cross Ref > Tool Basics

By Mike Prestwood

ASP Classic versus VB.Net: A side by side comparison between ASP Classic and VB.Net.

 
Tool Basics
 

Developer environment basics such as common file extensions, common keyboard shortcuts, etc.

Deployment Overview

[Other Languages] 
ASP Classic: 

With ASP Classic, you simply copy your files to a web server that is capable of running ASP pages. This includes your .ASP pages along with supporting files such as images, include files, and database files.

Optionally, you can also deploy a global.asa file which is used to code certain events like application start, application end, session start, and session end.

More Info / Comment
VB.Net: 

VB.Net projects require the .Net framework and any additional dependencies you've added such as Crystal Reports.

In Visual Studio.Net, you can create a Setup and Deployment project by using any of the templates available on the New Project dialog (Other Project Types).

In addition, VB.Net projects also support ClickOnce which brings the ease of Web deployment to Windows Forms and console applications. To get started, right click on your solution in the Solution Explorer, click Properties then select the Security tab. 

In addition, you can use any of the many free and commercially available installation packages.





Development Tools

[Other Languages] 

Languages Focus

Primary development tool(s) used to develop and debug code.

ASP Classic: 

Microsoft Visual Interdev was popular for several  years but isn't used as much any more. Any good editor such as Microsoft Expression Web, etc. will work but debugging is left up to interactive skills.

More Info / Comment
VB.Net: 

Microsoft Visual Basic Express Editions (as in Visual Basic 2008 Express Edition) and the full version of Microsoft Visual Studio.Net are the current primary tools. VB.Net is not compatible with VB Classic.

More Info / Comment  




File Extensions

[Other Languages] 

Languages Focus

Common or primary file extensions used (not a complete list, just the basics).

ASP Classic:   .ASP

.asp is the default extension for Active Server Pages (ASP) although some developers will change the default extension in an effort to add an additional security level. Although there is no clear standard for include files, using .INC is common but you must make sure that .INC files are not executed nor displayed.

More Info / Comment
VB.Net: 

Common source code file extensions include:

  • .SLN - Solution File. Contains solution specific information such as links to the projects within this solution.
  • .VBPROJ - VB.Net Project File. Contains project specific information in XML. When adding a file, it is added to the project file.
  • .VB -VB.Net source file.
  • .Designer.VB -VB.Net form file (a text resource file).
Syntax Example:
//Sample code snippet from the .vbproj project file:
<ItemGroup>
  <Compile Include="Cyborg.vb" />
  <Compile Include="Form1.vb">
    <SubType>Form</SubType>
  </Compile>
  //...




Overview and History

[Other Languages] 
ASP Classic: 

Language Overview: Class-based language. Although you can create classes, ASP is not fully OOP. It is a traditional language with a few OOP extensions. You code in a traditional approach using functions, procedures, and global data, and you can make use of simple classes to help organize your reusable code.

Target Platforms: ASP Classic is most suitable for creating websites targeting any browser (IIS Web Server with ASP Classic installed or equivalent).

More Info / Comment
VB.Net: 

Language Overview: VB.Net is an OOP language (no global functions or variables). You code using a fully OOP approach (everything is in a class).

Target Platforms: VB.Net is most suitable for creating .Net Framework applications. This includes desktop business application using WinForms and websites using WebForms.

More Info / Comment




Report Tools Overview

[Other Languages] 

Languages Focus

Built-In: Some development tools have a reporting tool built-in and some do not. For example, typically desktop databases such as Paradox and Access have a built-in reporting tool and typically that reporting tool is used with nearly every application built with it. A built-in reporting tool makes development of reports across many clients and applications consistent and therefore easy.

Add-On: Development tools that do not have a built-in reporting tool need to use either a currently bundled report writer, or one of the popular reporting tools that integrates well with the development tool. For example, popular reporting tools include Crystal Reports, ReportBuilder, and MS SQL Reporting Services (tied to MS SQL).

ASP Classic: 

No built-in report writer but because ASP Classic targets a client browser (a document interfaced GUI), a common solution is to simply output an HTML formatted page with black text and a white background (not much control but it does work for some situations).

More Info / Comment
VB.Net: 

Microsoft includes ReportViewer Starting with Visual Studio 2005. You can even surface this .Net solution in your VB Classic application if you wish.

For WebForm applications the client target is the browser (a document interfaced GUI), a common solution is to simply output an HTML formatted page with black text and a white background (not much control but it does work for some situations).

For WinForm applications, Crystal Reports is still very popular with VB.Net developers because it has been bundled with Visual Basic since VB 3, it's overall popularity, and compatibility with many different development tools.





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